Middle Way Monk Mode

My name is Gwyddion Flint, I’m a British writer, artist, meditation teacher and educator.

Although I have been ordained in the past I mainly teach Buddhist meditation on a secular basis (that is, non-religious) although if anyone asks me I’m only to happy to talk in depth about the Buddhist roots of meditation, suttas and other areas of Buddhism. I believe secular Buddhism to be the most accessible form of Buddhism for the vast majority of people around the world at this time. For more on secular Buddhism take a look at the work of Stephen Batchelor and scientific Buddhism, of which the author Robert Wright advocates. However that doesn’t mean that I’m against religious forms of Buddhism, I also support them wholeheartedly, I just try to avoid some of the more superstitious elements in my own practice.

I would like to use this blog as a means of keeping in contact with fellow meditators and students as well as share meditation resources and write articles about meditation and Buddhism.

In the past I have traveled to various countries in order to study meditation methods including Vipassanā, Zazen, and Dzogchen amongst others. I’m currently in the process of writing a book about Buddhist meditation and will be using it as a platform to create an online course in the near future. I want it to be as practical and understandable as possible, as well as enable beginners to progress to more advanced stages of meditation which, from my experience, can be very difficult to find the right information for, I hope it will also enable readers to see the context and connections between various forms of meditation.

In Metta,

Gwyddion (Andy)

Links:

Poetry and Spoken Word blog

Quora Profile

Spoken Word recordings

Published Poetry book on Amazon

Recent Posts

Yoga for Vipassanā

Below is a selection of yoga postures and postural exercises intended to help with flexibility and comfort while sitting in meditation. They will not help you sit in lotus pose immediately, but are intended to help with posture and comfort progressively over time, the more you do them the more they work and eventually they will allow your hips and legs to settle into lotus pose

Buddhism’s obsession with numbers

Buddhism has this uncanny (but useful) obsession with numbers, I believe this is because as it originated as an oral tradition, using groups of specific numbers would have helped the early Dhamma practitioners to remember vast amounts of rather complicated information and concepts.

Why Buddhism wouldn’t exist today without cultural appropriation

Most of us will have seen that person with a Buddha tattoo on her arm or a colourful t-shirt with the Buddha’s face on it. Perhaps even, as we are trying to hold ourselves in the downward dog position, caught the eye of the plastic Buddha statue residing in the corner of some yoga studio. But this is not a rant about the evils of ‘cultural appropriation’, much the opposite, this article will explain that without the cultural appropriation of Buddhism during the many long years since Shakyamuni’s parinirvana, the practice as we know it would not exist today. In fact it might not exist at all. As we shall see, the practice and the outward appearance of that practice are very different things.


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Recent Posts

Yoga for Vipassanā

Below is a selection of yoga postures and postural exercises intended to help with flexibility and comfort while sitting in meditation. They will not help you sit in lotus pose immediately, but are intended to help with posture and comfort progressively over time, the more you do them the more they work and eventually they will allow your hips and legs to settle into lotus pose

Why Buddhism wouldn’t exist today without cultural appropriation

Most of us will have seen that person with a Buddha tattoo on her arm or a colourful t-shirt with the Buddha’s face on it. Perhaps even, as we are trying to hold ourselves in the downward dog position, caught the eye of the plastic Buddha statue residing in the corner of some yoga studio. But this is not a rant about the evils of ‘cultural appropriation’, much the opposite, this article will explain that without the cultural appropriation of Buddhism during the many long years since Shakyamuni’s parinirvana, the practice as we know it would not exist today. In fact it might not exist at all. As we shall see, the practice and the outward appearance of that practice are very different things.

More Posts